On Flannery O’Connor’s ‘The Nature and Aim of Fiction’

This is a plain, free-write response to reading Flannery O'Connor's 'The Nature and Aim of Fiction'. It was written in my journal on the 4th of January of 2006, and I do not claim it to be superior writing, but rather personal. Please follow the link if you would like to read O'Connor's piece for…Read more On Flannery O’Connor’s ‘The Nature and Aim of Fiction’

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Memo #3 ~

Memo # 3 ~ Azar Nafisi, Reading Lolita in Tehran "What we love in other human beings is the hoped-for satisfaction of our desire. We do no love their desire. If what we loved in them was their desire, then we should love them as ourself." ~ Simone Weil The night is still around me.…Read more Memo #3 ~

Literature’s Unifying Force

Mary Kathryn Gough 11/11/05 Project #2 The Unifying Force of Kafka’s Literature: Drawing a Dual-Hearted World Together in Unity of Spirit "Could not then art and literature in a very real way offer succor to the modern world?" ~Aleksandr.Solzhenitzyn Of all malicious lies, the most sprawling and successful is the one which whispers softly, compellingly,…Read more Literature’s Unifying Force

Jane Eyre

this might need a wee bit of editing, but here is the main for the moment. A Historical Reading of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte's crisp and hauntingly heartful Jane Eyre, when read with an eye towards its historical perspective, is remarkably informative of the age in which its heroine lived. Jane is admittedly…Read more Jane Eyre

Midnight’s Children, by Salman Rushdie

Salman Rushdie's novel, Midnight's Children, won the 1981 Booker Prize, and in 1993 it was decided that Midnight's Children was the 'Booker of Bookers', or the best book to win the Booker Prize in a quarter century. The author of six novels, Rushdie has won awards from several countries for his writing over the years,…Read more Midnight’s Children, by Salman Rushdie